Aug 262013
 

Acupuncture, Chiropractic, and deep tissue, need I say more?

 

Company Logo

Company Logo

In Busan there is a wonderful man, named Dr. You. He is trained as an oriental medical doctor as well as a chiropractor. If you ever are having issues and want to try eastern medicine this is your guy.

 

He has gotten one of this medical degrees from Australia, so his knowledge of English is superb. He is also on the stronger side of things, so adjusting Western bodies is easier than say some shorter (smaller) Korean Doctors.

 

Going to his clinic is easy, granted you can call and the receptionists speak Korea, however, they do not take appointments, at least on Saturdays. There is steady business but the most I have had to wait is about 30 minutes. There is a TV in the waiting room, where random Korean shows play, and the room has a nice smell and a comfy couch, so if you bring a book, for the wait, you will be perfectly fine.

 

I was really hesitant at first because I have never tried acupuncture before. I knew I wanted to in Korea, but 1 was afraid of the doctor not speaking too much English, and 2 not really knowing what was going on.

 

When I first got there, he asked why I was in, I told him that I would like an adjustment and I was interested in acupuncture. I have been to a chiropractor for adjustments before, and by golly I adore them. There is nothing better than feeling that place in your back pop that you are not able to get to loosen.

 

Dr. You has a very unique way of adjustment. Unlike my doctor back home who is more focused on the position of the bones, and constant visits, Dr. You takes time to work out muscles as he is adjusting. So, there is an element of deep tissue with it. This is not for the hot stone massage enthusiast. Even with no prevalent ailments, he still managed to work out knots in my back I had been rubbing at for weeks.

 

After, he set me up with a 10 minute session of Acupuncture. I was nervous about this part because it was my first time. Each time a needle went in I could feel a small pinch, nothing to what I was expecting. I only felt about 1 of every 4 that went in too.

 

I laid on my stomach and waited. 10 min went by fast. I was given 10 minutes of “electrotherapy” which I have had before, and it does not hurt. It feels like there is just some slight buzzing but nothing is painful. Finished with 10 minute heat pack and I was out in about 45 minutes.

 

Now, cost. For people without health insurance, for the deep tissue, chiropractor, acupuncture, electrotherapy, and heat pack, it will set you back 50,000 KRW. Coming from the states, I do say, it was fairly inexpensive. Now, I did have health insurance, which take that number and cut it in half. Yes, that’s right, all of that for 25,000KRW.

 

I have to say that  I will for sure be coming back.

Directions:

From Suyeoung  go out exit 10. Walk straight about 200 m and on the corner there will be the clinic on third floor of that building.

http://www.byhand.co.kr/

Jun 212013
 

By Emma O’Flynn

2013-06-16 13.38.37

When it comes to dining out in Nampo, budget vegetarian options are pretty limited. So this little place was a great find, even though it’s not strictly vegetarian. Located in the basement, with a very unassuming entrance, Korean Banchan (side-dish) Heaven awaits. One does not go to this place for the Kimchi Jigae, or the Dwen Jang Jigae (although they are pretty good!). The major selling point for this restaurant is the buffet of sides that you can help yourself to, as much as you heart (and stomach) desires.

2013-06-16 13.05.44You must order something from the menu, before you go to the buffet. It’s a fairly short list (an English version is available), and includes the aforementioned jigaes, plus things like the donkasu (pork cutlet) and ice noodles. Once your order is in, you are free to hit the side dishes! They vary slightly each time, but almost always have the following in the selection: chap chey, padjeon, dakboki, kimchi, some fish (species unknown), salad (spicy and mayo), fresh lettuce and chilies, and the sweet rice stew porridge stuff. So there is something to everyone’s taste.

2013-06-16 13.21.30All this is available for the bargain price of 6,900 won. I have visited several times, including a weekend, and the place ranges from steadily busy, to choc-a-block, which I always take as a good sign. There are plenty of tables in the place, and the staff are very friendly and helpful (though not a lick’o’English between them), with a nice buzz at all times. A great place to take the weight off your feet and fill up your belly.

 

 

 

 

Directions (map below): Subway Line 1 to Nampo (111). This restaurant is located on same street as Arun Thai. It is a lot further up away from the main Nampo drag. As you walk up and one of the intersections there is a store on the left hand corner with a white header, conveniently called ‘Corner’. The entrance for the restaurant is almost on the opposite corner from this (just one or two more doors up). You will see the sign (pictured), and some food pictures at the top of the stairs.

 

 


View

Apr 252013
 
Photo by: Lizane Louw Photography

Photo by: Lizane Louw Photography

We are proud to bring you Busan’s 4th production of The Vagina Monologues. All the proceeds from the monologues and connected events go to charity, 90% of which will go to local women’s shelters right here in Busan, the other 10% to the global V-day cause.

Photo by: Lizane Louw Photography

Photo by: Lizane Louw Photography

The award-winning play is based on V-Day Founder/playwright Eve Ensler’s interviews with more than 200 women. With humor and grace the piece celebrates women’s sexuality and strength. Through this play and the liberation of this one word, countless women throughout the world have taken control of their bodies and their lives. For more than twelve years, The Vagina Monologues has given voice to experiences and feelings not previously exposed in public.

This year we will have three performances!
Saturday, April 27th at 7pm
Sunday, April 28th at 2pm
Sunday, April 28th at 7pm

Advanced tickets: Fully Booked in KSU for 12,000 won each(cash only).

Door Tickets: 15,000 won each (cash only).
Tickets will sell fast so buying in advance is suggested.
Facebook event can be found here
Stacy Front
Apr 122013
 

By LAURA TEAGUE

 

Layout 1

Part 2 of the Galmaetgil hikes!

The Galmaetgil trails span across Busan, about half of them wind along the extensive coastline, giving them the name “Seagull Path” in Hangeul. They explore all the best that this wonderful city of ours has to offer, the whole shebang covers around 270km, so where to start? Here’s your super awesome and helpful guide to help you out in this tricky conundrum.

 

Course Two: The most popular course among the locals, and the most ‘famous’ according to Busanites.

The shortest course end to end.

Course Two Part One: Very easy and familiar walk from Dalmaji Hill to Gwangalli beach, with some great views of the bridge and a lovely walk around Dongbaek Island. Not strenuous.

Course Two Part Two: A more strenuous walk from Gwangalli to Oryukdo, but some amazing views out over the whole coast from Haeundae to Gwangalli, definitely worth a try if you’re feeling energetic. 5km of this
walk is all up and down the stairway built into the cliff-face though, not for the first-timer. Take your own snacks, shops are hard to come by.

 

Course Three: The second favorite among the locals. This one is a mixed bag of city and mountain walking.

Course Three Part One: Oryukdo to Dayeon UN Memorial Park and Cemetery. A wonderful start, walking from Oryukdo to Sinseondae gives great views of the islands (five or six of them) and the part around Sinseondae Observatory shows amazing views of the Naval Base and the harbour where you can watch the transporter ships load and unload in the dock. After that it’s all road walking to Dayeon. Easy flat walk, but no natural beauty really.

Course Three Part Two: A super awesome walk that takes you through parts of the city you might otherwise miss. From Busanjin Market to Busan station, the first part is a proper rural city walk taking you past local markets, and then winding up through local houses onto Eomgwangsan, where you can look out over the whole city, and at the same time enjoy the fresh mountain air. Perfect mix of Busan’s best assets.

Apr 102013
 

Loving hut 1

**UPDATED 4/25/2014: CHECK OUT THE COMMENTS FOR THE LOCATION OF THE NEW ONE NEAR GUDEOK STADIUM!!

 

Note, this location is closer to Dongdaesin than Nampodong!

By: Emma O’Flynn

Calling all vegetarians!  Life in Korea can be challenging as a vegetarian, even more so as a vegan.  So when friend introduced me to Loving Hut in Seomyeon, I was thrilled!  And then I was equally devastated by it’s recent closure.  The following week I was summoned to a teacher’s lunch, and as we all piled into a couple of cars I was informed that we were going to a vegetarian restaurant.  Now, when a group of Koreans announce such a thing to me, I take it with a pinch of salt!  Perhaps they mean no beef or pork, or perhaps only small pieces of meat mixed through the dish, but not PROPER vegetarian!!!  So imagine my utter surprise, and delight, when we pulled up at a Loving Hut!

 

Loving hut 2Decorated with all the cuteness of a Korean coffee shop, this branch of Loving Hut provides a more homely feel than that of the former Seomyeon branch.  There are tables hidden in a number of little nooks and crannies to inhabit, and there is even a small hairdresser shop attached!  There is a decent selection of organic/vegetarian products for sale also, and an organic ice cream deli too.

 

Loving hut 3The menu is totally in Korean, but the owner was happy to translate for me.  Items include Indian style curry, a chilli, fried rice dishes, and soy-protein steak or Donkasa served with roast veggies.  They also had a pizza and salad.  The usual coffee, tea and juices are available.  I ordered the Donkasa which was served with roast veggies and brown rice, but also I was came with a small tomato, potato and veg soup, and a salad that included walnuts and blueberries, and balsamic dressing.  Additionally I had a coconut water, which is the one thing I would NOT recommend!  The food is a little pricey, however, when you consider the sides that come with the food, it is reasonably good value.

Loving hut 4

Directions: The restaurant is located in the Dongdaesin neighbourhood, not far from Jalgalchi.   The area can be reached by subway (Line 1, stop 108).  The street entrance is adjacent to the Gudok Baseball Stadium, where buses to/from Seomyeon leave from.  The street for the restaurant is next to a large chimney stack painted blue and white, there is a small hiking gear shop on the right hand side, it’s a short distance up at that turn off.  

 

Map coming soon…

 

Mar 252013
 

By Laura Teague

(this is the second half of a 2 part hike, to see part 1 go here)

imageThis is definitely a walk to test your hamstrings and calves. It’s a nice flat 3km away from Gwangalli beach around the coast, and then a grueling 5km of stairs up and down all the way to Oryukdo Cruise Wharf.

Continuing on from where Part 1 finished, this walk starts on Gwangalli Beach.

Follow the beach road away from the Haeundae end, so towards the watersports building at the far right side of beach. When you reach the water sports building, take the road just behind it, that’s following the coast and turning off to the left. There is a cycle hire shack here, and the cycle road beyond that. Follow the cycle road, and once again follow the signs that are spray-painted on the floor, wooden signs attached to the walls, or the blue and pink flags on the trees and lampposts.

image (1)Following the trail around to the base of Gwangan Bridge is easy, there is a handy little sign to tell you which way to go when you are crossing the river to get under the bridge, to the other side of the harbor. If you happen to miss this, you need to get under Gwangan Bridge, and you are aiming for a small white bridge allowing cars across. There are usually some fishermen on this bridge, or if not further on the path along the sea wall. From here, the Galmaetgil path takes you just to the right of the sea wall, by the road, through a wooded path. This eventually links up to the sea wall road and you can get some great views of Gwangan Bridge from the other side.

From the end of the sea wall, you are aiming uphill for the snazzy-looking ‘The View’ building, there are a few signs around, just keep an eye out for them. Once you have made it up the hill to ‘The View’ the path is incredibly easy, because there isn’t much opportunity to stray from it. Be warned however, from here the path is all up and down stairs all the way to Oryukdo, and there aren’t many places to get drinks and snacks from here, so make sure you have enough refreshments to keep you going.

image (5)The walk takes you right down to the Oryukdo Cruise Wharf, and there is a local fish market near the dock. This is where Course Two officially finishes and Course Three begins. But after all those stairs, maybe leave Course Three for another day!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Directions

To the start point: Take the subway to either Gwangan or Geumyeonsan Subway station on line 2, and make your way to the beach from there. 

To get back from the end point: The people in the tourist office on the Wharf are super helpful if you need them. With the tourist office at your back, look straight up the road that’s coming in to the roundabout. On the right hand side of the road there is a bus stop. Take either bus 27 or 131 and this will get you back to the KSU subway station which is on the green line.

 

 

 

Mar 252013
 

By LAURA TEAGUE

(this is part 1 of a 2 part series, to see the second half of the walk go here)

P1080160All across Busan are ‘hiking’ or walking trails that cover the city. They wind though the most beautiful sightseeing spots, and the best tourist places. The word ‘갈맷길’ is a hybrid of the word for ‘seagull’ and ‘road’ maybe because a lot of them follow the coast. There are nine in total, and five of them follow the coast, all the way from Imrang beach, down to Gadeokdo. The two considered most famous, or most popular, are courses two and three, and these are the only two for which there are maps in English, or any maps at all as far as I have found so far (please let me know if anyone can direct me to any kind of map for the rest of the trails). Even the maps that are available are not in any kind of detail, but for the most part, the trails are well marked with a combination of pink and blue flyers in the trees, wooden signs on lamp posts and spray painted markers on the pavements.

P1080143Course two begins on Dalmaji Hill, on the moon-tan road (so called for the night views). At this part of the course, there are a couple of maps that you can use to get an idea of the course ahead (and take note – this is the last map until Millak). From here, the course winds down the hill, and slightly left at the first major crossroads that you reach turn left down towards Haeundae beach. The course goes the length of the beach, and then around past the Westin Chosun to Dongbaek island, all the way round to Dongbaek harbour, and then follow the coast all the way around to Gwangalli. Just around the headland past Dongbaek harbour, when we went, the street was being repaved, so the signs on the road ended, but just keep following the coast, and you’ll see Gwangan Bridge ahead of you.

The signs pick back up again around when you can see the I-Park building on your right. Follow the new coastal road round until the view of the bridge disappears and the Marina appears on your left, from here the course is well signed and you cut through the Marina, to walk through the yacht docks. When you reach Busan Cinema Center, the signs disappear, turn right, so the Cinema Center is on your left, walk away from the marina and join the main road again, from here turn left back towards the Gwangan Bridge and the signs pick up again from here.

Layout 1Here you walk across a bridge than runs under the Gwangan Bridge, and Centum City is on your right. Follow the bridge across, and the route should be well sign posted. When you reach the other side of this bridge you need to head for the wooden walkway that is running underneath you. It’s pretty easy to get to when you know where you’re supposed to be headed. From here, the path is easy, this wooden walkway runs all the way to Gwangalli Beach.

This is halfway through course two, where we stopped. This route is about 10km, and took us 3 and a half hours.

 

Directions to Dalmaji Hill for the start point:Take the green line subway to Haeundae: from here take exit 1. Walk 10m to the bus stop find the stand for bus 100. Get on bus 100 and get off at Yeongnam apt (about 2 stops) and walk about 10 mins to the wooden walkway where this walk begins.

Alternatively you can take a taxi from Haeundae Station. Ask for ‘Alexander shikdang’ and this takes you pretty much to the start of this walk.

 

To view this entire walk on a map visit: HERE

Below is a map of the start point

 

 

 


View Galmaetgil Course 2 part 1 in a larger map

Mar 122013
 
Watch baseball with the best fans in Korea, Sajik, Busan

Come on out to Sajik!

Scroll down to see schedule!

One of THE BEST things to do in Busan is to go to a Lotte Giants game. Busan loves the Lotte Giants and it’s clear when you go to the games – fans are loud – singing, cheering, and drinking throughout the game. It’s a breath of fresh air after the lethargic crowds at Cincinnati Reds games that I’ve been to over the past 20 years.

It’s cheap, too! Only 7,500 for an outfield or upper-deck seat. Seats on the 1st or 3rd base line are around 10-15,000 (it’s hard to get a seat on the first base line… if you want these, go early!) Seats in better spots are up to 25,000 or so. Beer is only 2 for a can, and – just like home – you can buy it outside on your way in, or buy it from vendors in the stadium. NOTE: if you think it’s going to be crowded, then show up early, since there aren’t assigned seats.

A NOTE ON GETTING TICKETS: Buy tickets at the box office on game days. You can buy tickets from guys outside (scalpers) SOMETIMES (some sold out games we could get tickets; others, we were out of luck). Just be careful – our scalper tried to give us tickets for the wrong date. After we pointed out his “mistake,” he gave us the real tickets for a discounted price. So just be heads-up out there!

the crowd at the lotte giants opening game

The crowd… and yes, those are orange plastic bags on their heads.

NOTE: The box office opens 3 hours before the game if you want to show up early to be sure to get tickets. Getting tickets online didn’t work for me, but if you want to try, you have to use Internet Explorer and go to giantsclub.com. It’s in Korean, and they have an area where you can type in your ARC card number. For some reason (even with the help of some Koreans), the website wouldn’t accept my number (or any of my other foreign co-workers’ numbers), and wouldn’t let us get tickets that way.

(You can also buy tickets online but the website is in Korean, usually a Korean friend has no problem helping you buy them if you ask nicely)

Directions to the field: Metro line 3 (brown line) to Sajik, exit 1. Go one block and turn right. You can’t miss the stadium on your left. See map, below the schedule. (some sources say to take the subway to Sports Complex, but don’t do this. Sajik is closer, and it puts you at the front of the stadium).

So here’s the 2012 Lotte Giants baseball schedule. Home games in BOLD. All games and times are subject to change.

WEEKDAY GAMES are at 6:30.
WEEKEND GAMES:
In APRIL are different: Saturdays at 5pm; Sundays at 2pm.
After April, weekend games will all be at 5pm.

Tues Apr-02 Lotte Giants vs NC Dinos at Changwon
Wed Apr-03 Lotte Giants vs NC Dinos at Changwon
Thu Apr-04 Lotte Giants vs NC Dinos at Changwon
Fri Apr-05 Kia Tigers vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Sat Apr-06 Kia Tigers vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Sun Apr-07 Kia Tigers vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Fri Apr-12 Lotte Giants vs Doosan Bears at Jamsil, Seoul
Sat Apr-13 Lotte Giants vs Doosan Bears at Jamsil, Seoul
Sun Apr-14 Lotte Giants vs Doosan Bears at Jamsil, Seoul
Tues Apr-16 Nexen Heroes vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Wed Apr-17 Nexen Heroes vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Thu Apr-18 Nexen Heroes vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Fri Apr-19 Lotte Giants vs Samsung Lions Lions at Daegu
Sat Apr-20 Lotte Giants vs Samsung Lions Lions at Daegu
Sun Apr-21 Lotte Giants vs Samsung Lions Lions at Daegu
Tues Apr-23 SK Wyverns vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Wed Apr-24 SK Wyverns vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Thu Apr-25 SK Wyverns vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Fri Apr-26 Lotte Giants vs LG Twins at Jamsil, Seoul
Sat Apr-27 Lotte Giants vs LG Twins at Jamsil, Seoul
Sun Apr-28 Lotte Giants vs LG Twins at Jamsil, Seoul
Tues Apr-30 Lotte Giants vs Hanwha Eagles at Daegu
Wed May-01 Lotte Giants vs Hanwha Eagles at Daegu
Thu May-02 Lotte Giants vs Hanwha Eagles at Daegu
Fri May-03 Samsung Lions Lions vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Sat May-04 Samsung Lions Lions vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Sun May-05 Samsung Lions Lions vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Tues May-07 Lotte Giants vs Kia Tigers at Gwangju
Wed May-08 Lotte Giants vs Kia Tigers at Gwangju
Thu May-09 Lotte Giants vs Kia Tigers at Gwangju
Fri May-10 LG Twins vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Sat May-11 LG Twins vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Sun May-12 LG Twins vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Tues May-14 NC Dinos  vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Wed May-15 NC Dinos  vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Thu May-16 NC Dinos  vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Fri May-17 Lotte Giants vs SK Wyverns at Munhak, Incheon
Sat May-18 Lotte Giants vs SK Wyverns at Munhak, Incheon
Sun May-19 Lotte Giants vs SK Wyverns at Munhak, Incheon
Fri May-24 Lotte Giants vs Nexen Heroes at Mokdong, Seoul
Sat May-25 Lotte Giants vs Nexen Heroes at Mokdong, Seoul
Sun May-26 Lotte Giants vs Nexen Heroes at Mokdong, Seoul
Tues May-28 Doosan Bears vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Wed May-29 Doosan Bears vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Thu May-30 Doosan Bears vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Fri May-31 Lotte Giants vs Samsung Lions Lions at Daegu
Sat Jun-01 Lotte Giants vs Samsung Lions Lions at Daegu
Sun Jun-02 Lotte Giants vs Samsung Lions Lions at Daegu
Tues Jun-04 Kia Tigers vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Wed Jun-05 Kia Tigers vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Thu Jun-06 Kia Tigers vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Fri Jun-07 Lotte Giants vs LG Twins at Jamsil, Seoul
Sat Jun-08 Lotte Giants vs LG Twins at Jamsil, Seoul
Sun Jun-09 Lotte Giants vs LG Twins at Jamsil, Seoul
Tues Jun-11 Nexen Heroes vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Wed Jun-12 Nexen Heroes vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Thu Jun-13 Nexen Heroes vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Fri Jun-14 Hanwha Eagles vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Sat Jun-15 Hanwha Eagles vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Sun Jun-16 Hanwha Eagles vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Tues Jun-18 Lotte Giants vs Doosan Bears at Daegu
Wed Jun-19 Lotte Giants vs Doosan Bears at Daegu
Thu Jun-20 Lotte Giants vs Doosan Bears at Daegu
Fri Jun-21 Lotte Giants vs SK Wyverns at Munhak, Incheon
Sat Jun-22 Lotte Giants vs SK Wyverns at Munhak, Incheon
Sun Jun-23 Lotte Giants vs SK Wyverns at Munhak, Incheon
Tues Jun-25 NC Dinos  vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Wed Jun-26 NC Dinos  vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Thu Jun-27 NC Dinos  vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Tues Jul-02 Samsung Lions Lions vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Wed Jul-03 Samsung Lions Lions vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Thu Jul-04 Samsung Lions Lions vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Fri Jul-05 Lotte Giants vs Kia Tigers at Gwangju
Sat Jul-06 Lotte Giants vs Kia Tigers at Gwangju
Sun Jul-07 Lotte Giants vs Kia Tigers at Gwangju
Tues Jul-09 Lotte Giants vs Nexen Heroes at Mokdong, Seoul
Wed Jul-10 Lotte Giants vs Nexen Heroes at Mokdong, Seoul
Thu Jul-11 Lotte Giants vs Nexen Heroes at Mokdong, Seoul
Fri Jul-12 Lotte Giants vs NC Dinos at Changwon
Sat Jul-13 Lotte Giants vs NC Dinos at Changwon
Sun Jul-14 Lotte Giants vs NC Dinos at Changwon
Tues Jul-16 LG Twins vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Wed Jul-17 LG Twins vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Tues Jul-23 Lotte Giants vs Hanwha Eagles at Daejeon
Wed Jul-24 Lotte Giants vs Hanwha Eagles at Daejeon
Thu Jul-25 Lotte Giants vs Hanwha Eagles at Daejeon
Fri Jul-26 SK Wyverns vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Sat Jul-27 SK Wyverns vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Sun Jul-28 SK Wyverns vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Tues Jul-30 Doosan Bears vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Wed Jul-31 Doosan Bears vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Thu Aug-01 Doosan Bears vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Tues Aug-06 Kia Tigers vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Wed Aug-07 Kia Tigers vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Thu Aug-08 Lotte Giants vs LG Twins at Jamsil, Seoul
Fri Aug-09 Lotte Giants vs LG Twins at Jamsil, Seoul
Sat Aug-10 Lotte Giants vs SK Wyverns at Munhak, Incheon
Sun Aug-11 Lotte Giants vs SK Wyverns at Munhak, Incheon
Tues Aug-13 Lotte Giants vs Doosan Bears at Jamsil, Seoul
Wed Aug-14 Lotte Giants vs Doosan Bears at Jamsil, Seoul
Thu Aug-15 Nexen Heroes vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Fri Aug-16 Nexen Heroes vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Sat Aug-17 NC Dinos  vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Sun Aug-18 NC Dinos  vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Tues Aug-20 Lotte Giants vs Hanwha Eagles at Daejeon
Wed Aug-21 Lotte Giants vs Hanwha Eagles at Daejeon
Sat Aug-24 Samsung Lions Lions vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Sun Aug-25 Samsung Lions Lions vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Tues Aug-27 Lotte Giants vs Kia Tigers at Gwangju
Wed Aug-28 Lotte Giants vs Kia Tigers at Gwangju
Thu Aug-29 Hanwha Eagles vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Fri Aug-30 Hanwha Eagles vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Sat Aug-31 LG Twins vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Sun Sep-01 LG Twins vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Tues Sep-03 Lotte Giants vs Nexen Heroes at Mokdong, Seoul
Wed Sep-04 Lotte Giants vs Nexen Heroes at Mokdong, Seoul
Thu Sep-05 SK Wyverns vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Fri Sep-06 SK Wyverns vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Tues Sep-10 Lotte Giants vs NC Dinos at Changwon
Wed Sep-11 Lotte Giants vs NC Dinos at Changwon
Thu Sep-12 Lotte Giants vs Samsung Lions Lions at Daegu
Fri Sep-13 Lotte Giants vs Samsung Lions Lions at Daegu
Sat Sep-14 Doosan Bears vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Sun Sep-15 Doosan Bears vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Tues Sep-17 Hanwha Eagles vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan
Wed Sep-18 Hanwha Eagles vs Lotte Giants at Sajik, Busan

 


View Sajik Stadium in a larger map

Feb 282013
 

by FIONA VAN TYNE

Photo by Nicole Rafael

Photo by Nicole Rafael

We all know that the Korean term of “famous” just means “popular”. High 1 is thought to be the most “famous” resort in Korea, and by that they mean busy.

The mountain is located in the Gangwon-do province due north of Busan this resort is just the thing to get the more advanced mountain goers buzzing.

2013-02-10 09.45.42

The mountain its self has about 20 slopes ranging from beginner courses to expert only. The majority of the courses are labeled as “reds” which are translated to the better known “blacks”. The mountain does have two very long beginner runs that will challenge any new comer to the slopes, but is severely lacking in the “intermediate” or “blue” category.

 

Though there is no large “bunny hill” as you would find most places there are about 3 different set ups that are for the first timers. Only one has a “t bar” or a conveyer belt to help get from the bottom of the section to the top.

The map of the mountain is not very clear but its not terribly difficult to figure out once you are on the mountain.

 Highlights of High 1

Gondola service– There are 3 Gondola that service the mountain. With 5 stops total. If you end up staying on the mountain it is easy to get to and from the different ski houses this way. Another perk is that sometimes at the top it gets very cold and windy, if you are out winter sporting and have to take the classic chair lift up constantly, you are going to stay cold, and not want to be out as long. The gondolas offer a break from the wind and cold and keep your spirits alight. Granted it costs a little extra for the Gondola but if you book a ski package it should be included. Not to mention if you are taking a break, the gondola offers BREATHTAKING views of the surrounding mountains.

 

More advanced courses– If you have been winter sporting for a while then spending 2 days on a mountain can be enjoyable but it can be easy to get used to the mountain. High 1 is huge, and can take 2 full days to be able to do every run. There are 2 areas for jumps, rails and of course a half pipe. They are not always open so check with “guest services” to find out which areas are open for the day.

 

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Photo by Nicole Rafael

More advanced courses bring in more advanced skiers– this is important because the only thing worse than catching an edge and falling flat on your behind, is when someone cuts you off so close you run in to the fence. At High 1, given the nature of the difficult terrain the snow sports enthusiasts are capable of keeping their distance. Granted on the beginner courses you are going to face some challenges with other people, but once you begin on the intermediate or advanced courses there is plenty of room to enjoy yourself.

 There is a CASINO there- enough said.

 

Downfalls of High 1

Lines– Being the “most famous” resort in Korea, there are going to be a great amount of lines. Its going to take a while to get on said gondolas and each ski lift respectively. More people means more waiting time and you may not get as much time as you want on the slopes.

 

2013-02-10 13.13.06Hard mountain– the mountain gets a ton of snow, which is really nice, but they also make their own snow. The quality of the slopes is good but the mountain is about the density of concrete. Good for going fast, terrible for falling down. If you are new to snow sports prepare for a longer recovery time.

 

Resort Food– Now this is true for most ski resorts in Korea, the lack of food choices and space to eat lunch. There are 4 cafeterias located in the resort which will sell you Korean food for double what you would pay at home, this is completely fine, but where high 1 is lacking is the outside restaurants, there are only 4-5 on the mountain that are easy to get to. Compare with Muju’s little village of food, shops and clubs and high 1 is sparse. So it is much easier if you pack your own or prepare to eat KFC for a few meals.

 

How to get to High 1

So there are a two main ways you can do this:

With a Group:

Booking a trip to high 1 with a group in Busan is doable but you have a ton of restrictions. Companies offer ski and snowboard weekenders almost every month and these trips book out. They are on the cheaper end are usually filled with people who like to act like children, get drunk all the time and have no respect for personal space. If you enjoy spending a weekend with 15 people crammed in to a room make for 4 Koreans while being at the mercy of the group of 5 wasted people to get to sleep then this is the kind of trip for you. If your wallet is hurting and your personal tolerance is up then go for it! Things are all included except for food and generally the price is really good. They usually have a bus going from Busan, but many companies depart from Degu as well which is close! A few tours leave from Seoul as well for you frequent Seoul trippers.

 

 

On your own:

So you selected to go on your own, or with a smaller group of friends. How do you get to high 1? Well, you can always book through a travel agent, which is difficult because sometimes the fees can get you. Doing it on your own is easy as well.  Go on the English version of their website and poke around. They usually offer packages that if you stay on the resort you can get a discount, but there are plenty and I mean PLENTY of places to stay in the village nearby.

 

Getting there

You can take the train up to Seoul then the train over to Kohan (sometimes spelled Gohan), but that seems a bit silly.

There is a Bus that goes from Busan to Kohan bus terminal and back. This bus only goes 3 times a day, so check times before you go. The bus costs 33,000 won one way. You can also go from Taeback terminal and that bus costs 30,700 won. Note that the resort is closer to Kohan. From the bus terminal you can get a taxi that will take you to either your resort or your accommodation.

Note: for more bus information, if you call the resort and ask about the bus, they usually can find someone in English to give you all the information you would need. Also you can ask how to get from the village to the resort; sometimes they have shuttle buses so it would be a good chance to get to know where you need to go! Being the most “famous” resort, they usually have enough English speakers.

 

 

The English version of their website is here: High 1 English

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Feb 252013
 

BY Niall O Grady

Laochra 3

What is Gaelic Football? (video) 

Gaelic Football is an Irish sport very si milar to Australian Rules. It is is played on a rectangular pitch like a soccer pitch with H shaped goalposts much like the goals on a rugby pitch. A goal keeper protects the goal like in soccer.

The football can be kicked or “hand-passed” (a hand-pass is a striking motion with a closed fist). The football can also be carried but only for 4 steps. After every four steps the ball must be ‘played’. This means the ball must be either bounced or “solo-ed”.
Solo-ing can also be referred to as tapping the ball and is action of dropping the ball onto the foot and kicking it back into the hand. To carry the football over a distance a player must ‘play’ the ball every four sets. Players have as many consecutive solo’s as the like but may not bounce the ball twice in a row.

To score, the player can kick or hand-pass the ball over the crossbar for one point or kick the ball under the crossbar and into the net for a goal which equals three points. Each team consists of 15 players. Tackling is allowed in the men’s game but not in the ladies, it can be robust but not as much as in rugby.

Laochra 1Laochra GAA club was founded in June 2011 and thanks to our sponsors The Wolfehound Irish Pub, Haeundae, we have grown extensively since then. The club was set up to give the people of Busan an opportunity to play a new sport, meet new people and to bring the Irish culture to this dynamic city.

After taking a much deserved break after an exceptional 2012 season, Laochra are back. The 2013 season is about to kick off and Laochra are looking to recruit new players who are interested in playing. Laochra Busan consists of both a men’s and a women’s team and all interested players of all levels and abilities whether you have played before or not are more than welcome!!! It is an excellent sport and a fantastic way to keep fit, meet new people and have the Irish ‘Craic’. The 2012 squad boasted players from Ireland, England, Scotland, Wales, Canada, America, Australia and Korea and hopefully we will add more nationalities to this years squad.

The Club trains at Samryak Park in Sasang at 12 noon every Saturday, the first training will be held on Saturday, the 9th of March.

Laochra 2The season consists of four tournaments in Korea. One tournament is hosted by each of the three Gaelic football clubs, Laochra Busan GAA (June), Daegu Fianna (May) and Seoul Gaels (July) and then the Korean Gaelic Games will be held in Busan in September. In October, the Asian Gaelic Games will be held in Kuala Lumpur again this year. Last year, Laochra sent a team to the AGGs for the first time and were very unfortunate not to return with silverware. Lets hope were more successful this season.

Laochra Abú!

How to find us…

Laochra Busan GAA Website – Here 

Contact Us by Email – busangaa@gmail.com
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Laochra Busan 2012 Season